Sunday, January 09, 2005

Weeding Out the Bad Seeds

My father told me about a jewish radio show he was listening to. He said they asked all the right questions, like supporting in kollel, (which is a huge one that takes more work than your average post) and the question about Yeshivos being selective.

I'll put it simply.

The parents of the bad kids want etheir kids to receive the love and care that they need to straighten out. They also hope that if they are surrounded by the good kids, they'll be influenced by them.

The parents of the good kids are afraid that their kids will be influenced by the bad kids.

So we have all these Yeshivos for the screwed up kids. That doesn't work because the bad kids all end up influencing each other, and unfortunately, the administration there is not always powerful enough to combat the drugs and all that bad stuff that goes on. There are no good kids to help out the bad ones. Then again, there are no good kids being screwed up by the bad ones.

Solution, anyone?

6 Comments:

At 1/10/2005 6:55 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Let them go to the mainstream schools, but the minute they get out of line, goodbye. This will show that (a) we believe in them, that they have the ability to do well; and (b) it gives them a sense of responsibility, that they have to do the right thing.

That's how it was in the olden days, and I believe it's the best way.

 
At 1/11/2005 10:04 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think we should go to the main stream schools and ask for "normal" volenteers who would like to be with the "bad" kids. This way they will not be affected by the "bad" kids because they know they are together with "bad" kids and the "bad" kids will be glad that there are "normal" kids in their school.

 
At 1/13/2005 12:33 PM, Blogger Yeshiveh Bucher said...

From what I've seen I can say that it's almost inevitable that the "bad" kid's presence in a "normal" school will have a negative effect on the "good" kids. On the other hand, it's hard to come by a "good" kid having a positive effect on the "bad" kid. The best solution is to send them to a special school, as is often being done today. But of course it depends on how bad the kid is.
Anonymous: The kid that is considered a candidate was presumably already enrolled in a normal school, which has proven to be no good for them or the good kids.

 
At 1/14/2005 8:28 AM, Blogger Michelle said...

yeshiveh bucher: I definitely agree with you, but something tells me this isn't the best solution. It also really depends on the kid's level of screwed-upness. Sometimes kids feel even worse when they are singled-out and are more likely to rebel.

 
At 1/14/2005 9:38 AM, Blogger Yeshiveh Bucher said...

Michelle:
I agree with you as you can see from what I wrote in the end of the first paragraph of my previous post. I can tell you that from first hand experience. I was actually kicked out of high school because I smoked a few cigarettes. Now at that point I was one of the "best" (in learning) in my grade. But unfortunately, from there on it was downhill...
(and then uphill again.)

 
At 12/15/2005 9:53 AM, Anonymous Chani said...

No matter how selective you get, there's always going to be some kids in the grade who are less "good," smart, or whatever else. And besides, as you well know, sometimes people can be so off when they decide who's good or bad. So to an extent, you gotta be selective, but I like anonymous #1's idea. Let them in, tell them the rules & give them 3 chances. In a nice way(if that's possible) tell them that they have 3 strikes & then they're out.

 

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